Design, Develop, Create

Thursday, 19 April 2018

Building Creative Teams

A short statement on building creative teams.
https://qsblc.ucd.ie/videos/building-creative-teams-and-collectives/
And a link to the whole collection of Learning Insights from the UCD Lochlann Quinn School of Business.

Friday, 13 April 2018

The Human Centred Design Kit

Reimagining the shopping cart - IDEO's deep dive process filmed for ABC’s late-night news show Nightline (1999), narrated by Ted Koppel (link).

IDEO have put together a little book on design research ethics - do no harm right! (link)
"Respect your participants!
Some methods depend upon other people, often strangers, sharing generously their time, thoughts, and feelings. Have consideration for their health, safety, privacy, and dignity at all times.
Her are some principles that guide IDEO's interactions with participants:

  • approach people with courtesy
  • identify yourself, your intent, and what you are looking for
  • offer to compensate participants
  • describe how you will use this information and why it's valuable
  • get permission to use the information and any photos or video you take
  • keep all the information you gather confidential
  • let people know they can decline to answer questions or stop participating at any time
  • maintain a nonjudgmental, relaxed, and enjoyable atmosphere" (IDEO, 2003)

IDEO.org has also created a set of resources for human-centred design for impact in challenging environments. The Field Guide is a new take on the IDEO design cards which I have used for teaching for a number of years. The examples/cases in the book provide nice illustrations for my students. Go to designkit.org for Design Kit: The Human-Centered Design Toolkit from IDEO for a range of resources and courses - many free.
Books, guides, and free downloads from designkit.org

  • From IDEO itself on the Method cards (link).
  • As a diversion, MethodKit have indexed a large collection of social, entertainment, cultural and business purpose card sets (link)

Monday, 9 April 2018

The poster presentations

For the group project for “Managing Strategy and Innovation in a Digital Era” students were asked to create posters for an interactive poster presentation session. Photos from the day are attached below.

The class of 2016-17 

Wednesday, 4 April 2018

Photos from the design/build challenge 2017-18















Guest lecture: MIS40920 BusInfo Systems Mgt (for ME/MEngSc programmes)

Q115 10-11am, April 4, 2018.
Research articles - discussion of the following articles.
Both articles are readily accessible via the library's OneSearch function.
  • Catmull, E. (2008). How pixar fosters collective creativity. Harvard Business Review, 89(9):9.
  • Hargadon, A. B. and Bechky, B. A. (2006). When collections of creatives become creative collectives: A field study of problem solving at work. Organization Science, 17(4):484– 500.
The situation is... yes and...

Establish an understanding of shared knowledge 
Q: what do I know about...
...writing software?
...software engineering?
...working in teams?

Knowledge of engineering management concepts divulged in class

A framing device for locating creativity along origin and time

Sunday, 18 March 2018

Exercise: design and planning game

Goal
To demonstrate and experience one particular process of planning in a team environment where knowledge and expertise is distributed among team members.

Roles/Identities:
  • Product Owner: Product owner judges the trade-off between value and timing of features. Will engage in discussions at the PLANNING GAME, prioritising and valuing features. Is authoritative to accept a feature as developed or NOT.
  • Architect: Architect identifies links between features, architectural/design and delivery elements. Creates diagrams linking Features (F) with architectural elements (A) and deliverables (D).
  • Lead Developer and extra developers if available: Developers provide estimates of effort and risk for design-delivery elements. Have important domain knowledge and suggests needed features. Is authoritative on estimates for effort or time of a design-delivery element.
  • Scrum Master: Scrum master (or someone assigned) will turn feature and development stories into a planning chart and highlight the critical path.
Activities 
The Scum master keeps the PLANNING GAME focused by:
  • asking “what (F) features do we need?”
  • asking “what (D) deliverables satisfy (F)?”
  • asking “how does (A) architecture link (F) & (D)?”
Allocate approximately
Feature Discussion (5 minutes)
Design-delivery discussion (~5 minutes)
Architecture discussion (~5 minutes)
Decide backlog (~10 minutes)

Debriefing
~10’ Discussion: group pairs report progress to the whole class.
Was there a perfect solution?

Research and Further Reading

Tuesday, 20 February 2018

design mapping and idea tools

https://mural.co/
https://luma-institute.com/
https://www.invisionapp.com/
http://www.xplane.com/ (https://medium.com/the-xplane-collection)
http://gamestorming.com/
https://innovation-awards.nl/news/quick-guide-design-thinking/
https://medium.com/@harrybr/how-to-run-an-empathy-user-journey-mapping-workshop-813f3737067

Monday, 5 February 2018

designingwithpeople.org - methods for research projects

'designing with people' is an archive of user research and design methods hosted by designingwithpeople.org at the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design at the Royal College of Art

Choose the right methods for your project
People, activities, methods and ethics. Four practical research guide frameworks derive from the i-design project involving the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design Royal College of Art, the Engineering Design Centre University of Cambridge, the Well-being Institute University of Cambridge, and the Loughborough Design School University of Loughborough.

Monday, 20 November 2017

ECIS 2018 - Nov 27th 2017 - deadline for papers (CfPs)

The Paper Submission system is now open.
Paper Submission deadline: November 27th, 2017 – 23:59 pm GMT

Beyond Digitization – Facets of Socio-Technical Change

ECIS 2018 will take place in Portsmouth, UK, at the University of Portsmouth, where it is hosted by the Systems and Information Systems Research Group in the School of Computing.

The theme of the conference: “Beyond Digitization – Facets of Socio-Technical Change” reflects that information systems (IS) consist of both human and technical aspects. The development of the IS discipline since the 1960’s has been characterised by efforts to achieve a forward trajectory from a software-centred focus towards a human-centred focus. This is reflected in the agendas of many of the original socio-technical movements, and underpins the recent resurgence in interest in socio-technical ideas.

The foundation of the IS discipline (in the late Sixties) is built on the proposition that any artefact on which we turn an IS lens cannot be seen as hardware, software or human-based in isolation. This is still true in an increasingly digital world. We, in the IS discipline, are constantly faced with the reality that we engage and pursue an agenda to facilitate change, or redevelopment of organized human activities. The digital world has and is resulting in fundamental changes throughout society affecting organisations and human endeavour. The socio-technical theme provides a base to make sense of IS within the digitized world.

We invite you to participate in the AIS conference ECIS 2018, taking place in the historic naval city of Portsmouth.

Peter Bednar, School of Computing, University of Portsmouth, UK
Ulrich Frank, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany
Karlheinz Kautz, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University, Australia


Conference Co-Chairs

Wednesday, 8 November 2017

Computer Drop Off Day - Camara Education

UCDVO in partnership with Camara Education are holding the next Computer Drop Off day on Tuesday 14th November 2017 from 10am - 4pm in Belfield, UCD.

Drop off location in the Newman Building, Arts Basement, behind College Tribune Office.
Donated equipment can only be accepted on Tuesday 14th November 2017 from 10am - 4pm at this location.

Each computer recycled keeps machines out of landfills and enriches the lives of up to 21 children.

http://www.ucdvo.org/events/donatecomputers/

Tuesday, 7 November 2017

The blame is not for failure

Jørgen Vig Knudstorp: At LEGO, Growth and Culture Are Not Kid Stuff
"The blame is not for failure, it is for failing to help or ask for help"
Grant Freeland interviews Jørgen Vig Knudstorp (Boston Consulting Group video)


Friday, 3 November 2017

Exercise: (a) Design a search page

This exercise familiarises students with interface design approaches and tools. The exercise is inspired by Carol Snyder's book titled "Paper Prototyping" (2003).

Objective
To practice creating design artifacts to display and test technology use/interaction ideas.

Material
Sheets of A4 paper, post-it notes, pens and pencils of different colours.

Instructions
1. In groups of 2 or 3 use paper/pencil sketch a mockup of a basic Internet ‘search page’. (allocate 10")
2. Collect the sketches and display them to the class; allow the group to provide a brief commentary. (allocate 10" to display all mockups).
3. In the same groups use Balsamiq to create a digital version of the design. The new design may vary from the paper/pencil sketch. (allocate 15")
4. Discuss the following reflection points (in groups first followed by class discussion). (allocate 10")

Reflection
Describe your feelings and thoughts on the process of translating your ideas into a concrete representation.
Comment on the discussion dynamics within the group.
How did the tool used shape, constrain or enable your design thinking?
Consider the difference between paper/pencil sketch vs Balsamiq.

References
Snyder, C. (2003) Paper Prototyping: The fast and easy way to design and refine user interfaces, San Francisco, CA, Morgan Kaufmann, Elsevier Science.



Student Examples

Whole class examples in collage:
designdiagrams01

Exercise: (b) Design a text-free search interface

This is the second part of the design exercise. The goal is to familiarise students with interface design approaches and tools. Use the Balsamiq tool to mock-up the design.

Objective
To practice creating design artifacts to display and test technology use/interaction ideas.

Material
Sheets of A4 paper, post-it notes, pens and pencils of different colours.

Instructions
1. In groups of 2 or 3 use paper/pencil sketch a mockup of a new kind of Internet ‘search page’ that doesn’t use text (at all)! (allocate 10")
2. Collect the sketches and display them to the class; allow the group to provide a brief commentary. (allocate 10" to display all mockups).
3. In the same groups use Balsamiq to create a digital version of the design. The new design may vary from the paper/pencil sketch. (allocate 15")
4. Discuss the following reflection points (in groups first followed by class discussion). (allocate 10")

Reflection
How did the quality and level of design discussion differ from the earlier exercise?
Comment on how you conceptualised or simulated the 'user' of your design.

References
Snyder, C. (2003) Paper Prototyping: The fast and easy way to design and refine user interfaces, San Francisco, CA, Morgan Kaufmann, Elsevier Science.
The Balsamiq Mockups wireframing tool is accessed online at https://balsamiq.com/products/mockups (accessed: 2010-2011)



Student Examples

Dilyan's example: Fast booking mock up: Fast booking mock up

Whole class examples in collage:
designdiagrams02

Exercise: (c) Design for search by smell

(a collaboration with Norman Su) A variation on earlier design exercises (exercise a and exercise b)

Objective
Theory: To demonstrate the design dynamics surrounding paper sketches, digital sketches, and speculate on the implications for digital design environments.
Practice: To gain practice at creating sketches and digital design artifacts to display and test technology use/interaction ideas.

Materials
Sheets of A4 paper, post-it notes, pens and pencils of different colours.
Online access to the Balsamiq Mockups wireframing tool. http://webdemo.balsamiq.com/ (accessed: 2015-05-22. Also see http://balsamiq.com/products/mockups (accessed: 2010-2011)

Instructions Part 1
1. In groups of 2 or 3 use paper/pencil sketch a mockup of a new kind of App that uses 'scent' or 'smells'! (allocate 10")
2. Assume there is some way to capture 'scent' or 'smells'.
3. 10 minutes
4. Let me know (raise your hand, etc.) when you’re done

Instructions Part 2
5. In the same groups use Balsamiq to create a digital version of the design. The new design may vary from the paper/pencil sketch.
Tips:
Mockup → Download as PDF (to save a copy of your finished design)
Mockup → Clear Mockup (but don't mistakenly wipe your mockup before you save a copy)
6. 15 minutes
7. Let me know (raise your hand, etc.) when you’re done
8. Discuss the following reflection points (in groups first followed by class discussion). (allocate 5")

Reflection
Your own thoughts/observations?
How many design possibilities were sketched on paper? In Balsamiq?
Consider the difference between paper/pencil sketch vs Balsamiq.
How did the tool used shape, constrain or enable your design thinking?
Comment on the discussion dynamics within the group.
Did someone take responsibility for driving the group forward?
Describe your feelings and thoughts on the process of translating your ideas into different concrete representations.
Can you identify 'who contributed what' to the designs?

References
"Sniffing Entrapped Humans with Sensor Arrays" (link) & NewAtlas article (link)Chat Perf for smartphone. Intro article on Gizmag (link)
SAPER app (link on gizmag). Not quite an electronic nose but close.
Wongchoosuk et al, (2009) Detection and Classification of Human Body Odor Using an Electronic Nose. Sensors, 9, 7234-7249. (doi 10.3390/s90907234 - resolve via dx.doi.org)
How Internet Odors Will Work (howstuffworks.com)
Related imagery and concepts on the Edible Geography blog (ediblegeography.com)

Monday, 30 October 2017

Exercise: Battleship as a metaphor for Plans or Planning

Exploring the difference between design and designing, or  plan and planning.

Step 1:
Individuals produce one or more up-front plans using provided blank sheets.

Step 2:
Open the playable version of battleship on GitHub.
Enter each up-front plan using the 40 shots per iteration game.

Step 3:
Enter your results in the survey form (survey form here)
Look at and discuss the results (data spreadsheet here)

Step 4:
Allocate 'iteration ranges' to individuals or groups and ask them to attempt to obtain the best possible result.
Continue to capture the result of each game in the survey form (survey form here)
Look at and discuss the results (data spreadsheet here)

Discussion:
What might 'design' be with respect to this game?
What might 'strategy' be with respect to this game?
What might 'project planning' be with respect to this game?
What (if anything) might this exercise highlight for projects in general?

Notes and References:

The members of Zilverblog have developed a simple version of the Battleship game, written in Javascript, as a tool to illustrate a number of ideas that seem to be relevant to planning systems development. For example:
The difference between Plans and Planning
The value of feedback
Cost and reward
The size of an effort versus the payback in terms of information
The game-like nature of projects (like pinball, the goal is to play again?)

From the Zilverblog The Power of Feedback in Scrum:
Update: Now also direct playable on GitHub.
"Board layouts are random and you get 40 shots in total to destroy the enemy’s fleet. After each iteration you get feedback about hits and misses. If you use iterations of 1, you are playing the regular battleship-game. Each shot costs 10.000 and when you sink a ship you get the_ships_size * 50.000 (e.g. the submarine of size 3 will reward you with 150.000). If you keep track of the balance after each iteration, you could also try to get across the idea that stopping after a few iterations might give ‘good enough’ rewards. It can be downloaded from our GitHub repository as a zip or you can take a look at our code. Just double click on the index.html (in the public folder) to start a game."


Wednesday, 25 October 2017

Thursday networking evening - social and pizza - scholars and alumni

Thursday November 2 2017 - the MSc Digital Innovation cohort

All welcome to our Thursday evening gathering at the Smurfit Lounge.
social and pizza - scholars and alumni

Please register here https://goo.gl/pFf6fb

We are open for networking from 17:00. Pizza+options and refreshment provided by Urban Picnic.

For directions in Google Maps (link)

Monday, 23 October 2017

Colossal Cave Adventure

An archeology of interactive role playing games leads inevitably to a small handful of innovative and influential programs developed over the decade spanning the sixties and seventies. One of the most influtential of these games was a program call the Colossal Cave Adventure. Originally written by Will Crowther, then developed further by Don Woods with Will's consent.
Ports of Adventure to newer operating platforms and language environments have enabled users to play Adventure on successive generations of computing hardware and operating system environments. However the core of the game remains the same and concept, gameplay and feel. A player running the port to Mac OS/X or the console version for Windows XP is subject to essentially the same experience as those who encountered it on University computer servers in the 70s and 80s.
While the game is no longer actively developed the concept of Advent inspired a host of related programmes in the 1980s all vying for the hearts, minds, or money, of the world's growing band of computer enthusiasts and users.

Seeing Adventure running for the first time is like walking along the beach and picking up an interesting looking shell. Someone has left the terminal logged in... It intrigues with three sentences:

YOU ARE STANDING AT THE END OF A ROAD BEFORE A SMALL BRICK
BUILDING . AROUND YOU IS A FOREST. A SMALL
STREAM FLOWS OUT OF THE BUILDING AND DOWN A GULLY.
Ahh, a game. What do I do? The blinking cursor invites me to write something.

help!
 I DON'T KNOW THAT WORD.

help
 I KNOW OF PLACES, ACTIONS, AND THINGS. MOST OF MY VOCABULARY
 DESCRIBES PLACES AND IS USED TO MOVE YOU THERE. TO MOVE TRY
 WORDS LIKE FOREST, BUILDING, DOWNSTREAM, ENTER, EAST, WEST
 NORTH, SOUTH, UP, OR DOWN.  I KNOW ABOUT A FEW SPECIAL OBJECTS,
 LIKE A BLACK ROD HIDDEN IN THE CAVE. THESE OBJECTS CAN BE
 MANIPULATED USING ONE OF THE ACTION WORDS THAT I KNOW. USUALLY
 YOU WILL NEED TO GIVE BOTH THE OBJECT AND ACTION WORDS
 (IN EITHER ORDER), BUT SOMETIMES I CAN INFER THE OBJECT FROM
 THE VERB ALONE. THE OBJECTS HAVE SIDE EFFECTS - FOR
 INSTANCE, THE ROD SCARES THE BIRD.
 USUALLY PEOPLE HAVING TROUBLE MOVING JUST NEED TO TRY A FEW
 MORE WORDS. USUALLY PEOPLE TRYING TO MANIPULATE AN
 OBJECT ARE ATTEMPTING SOMETHING BEYOND THEIR (OR MY!)
 CAPABILITIES AND SHOULD TRY A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT TACK.
 TO SPEED THE GAME YOU CAN SOMETIMES MOVE LONG DISTANCES
 WITH A SINGLE WORD. FOR EXAMPLE, 'BUILDING' USUALLY GETS
 YOU TO THE BUILDING FROM ANYWHERE ABOVE GROUND EXCEPT WHEN
 LOST IN THE FOREST. ALSO, NOTE THAT CAVE PASSAGES TURN A
 LOT, AND THAT LEAVING A ROOM TO THE NORTH DOES NOT GUARANTEE
 ENTERING THE NEXT FROM THE SOUTH. GOOD LUCK!
Right, I'm starting to get this, lets see what the 'DOWNSTREAM' command does...

downstream
YOU ARE IN A VALLEY IN THE FOREST BESIDE A STREAM TUMBLING
ALONG A ROCKY BED.

downstream
AT YOUR FEET ALL THE WATER OF THE STREAM SPLASHES INTO A
2 INCH SLIT IN THE ROCK. DOWNSTREAM THE STREAMBED IS BARE ROCK.

lift rock
YOU ARE IN A 20 FOOT DEPRESSION FLOORED WITH BARE DIRT. SET INTO
THE DIRT IS A STRONG STEEL GRATE MOUNTED IN CONCRETE. A DRY
STREAMBED LEADS INTO THE DEPRESSION.

THE GRATE IS LOCKED

downstream
YOU CAN'T GO IN THROUGH A LOCKED STEEL GRATE!

This is getting interesting, quick, grab a piece of paper and start drawing a mental map of where I was and where I'm going...

And so it goes on. Time passes, I snap back to myself for a moment, twenty minutes later! What's happening here? It's engaging, appealing, frustrating and rewarding, like getting into a good book but this one talks back to you.