Design, Develop, Create

Monday, 20 November 2017

ECIS 2018 - Nov 27th 2017 - deadline for papers (CfPs)

The Paper Submission system is now open.
Paper Submission deadline: November 27th, 2017 – 23:59 pm GMT

Beyond Digitization – Facets of Socio-Technical Change

ECIS 2018 will take place in Portsmouth, UK, at the University of Portsmouth, where it is hosted by the Systems and Information Systems Research Group in the School of Computing.

The theme of the conference: “Beyond Digitization – Facets of Socio-Technical Change” reflects that information systems (IS) consist of both human and technical aspects. The development of the IS discipline since the 1960’s has been characterised by efforts to achieve a forward trajectory from a software-centred focus towards a human-centred focus. This is reflected in the agendas of many of the original socio-technical movements, and underpins the recent resurgence in interest in socio-technical ideas.

The foundation of the IS discipline (in the late Sixties) is built on the proposition that any artefact on which we turn an IS lens cannot be seen as hardware, software or human-based in isolation. This is still true in an increasingly digital world. We, in the IS discipline, are constantly faced with the reality that we engage and pursue an agenda to facilitate change, or redevelopment of organized human activities. The digital world has and is resulting in fundamental changes throughout society affecting organisations and human endeavour. The socio-technical theme provides a base to make sense of IS within the digitized world.

We invite you to participate in the AIS conference ECIS 2018, taking place in the historic naval city of Portsmouth.

Peter Bednar, School of Computing, University of Portsmouth, UK
Ulrich Frank, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany
Karlheinz Kautz, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University, Australia


Conference Co-Chairs

Wednesday, 8 November 2017

Computer Drop Off Day - Camara Education

UCDVO in partnership with Camara Education are holding the next Computer Drop Off day on Tuesday 14th November 2017 from 10am - 4pm in Belfield, UCD.

Drop off location in the Newman Building, Arts Basement, behind College Tribune Office.
Donated equipment can only be accepted on Tuesday 14th November 2017 from 10am - 4pm at this location.

Each computer recycled keeps machines out of landfills and enriches the lives of up to 21 children.

http://www.ucdvo.org/events/donatecomputers/

Tuesday, 7 November 2017

The blame is not for failure

Jørgen Vig Knudstorp: At LEGO, Growth and Culture Are Not Kid Stuff
"The blame is not for failure, it is for failing to help or ask for help"
Grant Freeland interviews Jørgen Vig Knudstorp (Boston Consulting Group video)


Friday, 3 November 2017

Exercise: (a) Design a search page

This exercise familiarises students with interface design approaches and tools. The exercise is inspired by Carol Snyder's book titled "Paper Prototyping" (2003).

Objective
To practice creating design artifacts to display and test technology use/interaction ideas.

Material
Sheets of A4 paper, post-it notes, pens and pencils of different colours.

Instructions
1. In groups of 2 or 3 use paper/pencil sketch a mockup of a basic Internet ‘search page’. (allocate 10")
2. Collect the sketches and display them to the class; allow the group to provide a brief commentary. (allocate 10" to display all mockups).
3. In the same groups use Balsamiq to create a digital version of the design. The new design may vary from the paper/pencil sketch. (allocate 15")
4. Discuss the following reflection points (in groups first followed by class discussion). (allocate 10")

Reflection
Describe your feelings and thoughts on the process of translating your ideas into a concrete representation.
Comment on the discussion dynamics within the group.
How did the tool used shape, constrain or enable your design thinking?
Consider the difference between paper/pencil sketch vs Balsamiq.

References
Snyder, C. (2003) Paper Prototyping: The fast and easy way to design and refine user interfaces, San Francisco, CA, Morgan Kaufmann, Elsevier Science.



Student Examples

Whole class examples in collage:
designdiagrams01

Exercise: (b) Design a text-free search interface

This is the second part of the design exercise. The goal is to familiarise students with interface design approaches and tools. Use the Balsamiq tool to mock-up the design.

Objective
To practice creating design artifacts to display and test technology use/interaction ideas.

Material
Sheets of A4 paper, post-it notes, pens and pencils of different colours.

Instructions
1. In groups of 2 or 3 use paper/pencil sketch a mockup of a new kind of Internet ‘search page’ that doesn’t use text (at all)! (allocate 10")
2. Collect the sketches and display them to the class; allow the group to provide a brief commentary. (allocate 10" to display all mockups).
3. In the same groups use Balsamiq to create a digital version of the design. The new design may vary from the paper/pencil sketch. (allocate 15")
4. Discuss the following reflection points (in groups first followed by class discussion). (allocate 10")

Reflection
How did the quality and level of design discussion differ from the earlier exercise?
Comment on how you conceptualised or simulated the 'user' of your design.

References
Snyder, C. (2003) Paper Prototyping: The fast and easy way to design and refine user interfaces, San Francisco, CA, Morgan Kaufmann, Elsevier Science.
The Balsamiq Mockups wireframing tool is accessed online at https://balsamiq.com/products/mockups (accessed: 2010-2011)



Student Examples

Dilyan's example: Fast booking mock up: Fast booking mock up

Whole class examples in collage:
designdiagrams02

Exercise: (c) Design for search by smell

(a collaboration with Norman Su) A variation on earlier design exercises (exercise a and exercise b)

Objective
Theory: To demonstrate the design dynamics surrounding paper sketches, digital sketches, and speculate on the implications for digital design environments.
Practice: To gain practice at creating sketches and digital design artifacts to display and test technology use/interaction ideas.

Materials
Sheets of A4 paper, post-it notes, pens and pencils of different colours.
Online access to the Balsamiq Mockups wireframing tool. http://webdemo.balsamiq.com/ (accessed: 2015-05-22. Also see http://balsamiq.com/products/mockups (accessed: 2010-2011)

Instructions Part 1
1. In groups of 2 or 3 use paper/pencil sketch a mockup of a new kind of App that uses 'scent' or 'smells'! (allocate 10")
2. Assume there is some way to capture 'scent' or 'smells'.
3. 10 minutes
4. Let me know (raise your hand, etc.) when you’re done

Instructions Part 2
5. In the same groups use Balsamiq to create a digital version of the design. The new design may vary from the paper/pencil sketch.
Tips:
Mockup → Download as PDF (to save a copy of your finished design)
Mockup → Clear Mockup (but don't mistakenly wipe your mockup before you save a copy)
6. 15 minutes
7. Let me know (raise your hand, etc.) when you’re done
8. Discuss the following reflection points (in groups first followed by class discussion). (allocate 5")

Reflection
Your own thoughts/observations?
How many design possibilities were sketched on paper? In Balsamiq?
Consider the difference between paper/pencil sketch vs Balsamiq.
How did the tool used shape, constrain or enable your design thinking?
Comment on the discussion dynamics within the group.
Did someone take responsibility for driving the group forward?
Describe your feelings and thoughts on the process of translating your ideas into different concrete representations.
Can you identify 'who contributed what' to the designs?

References
Chat Perf for smartphone. Intro article on Gizmag (link)
SAPER app (link on gizmag). Not quite an electronic nose but close.
Wongchoosuk et al, (2009) Detection and Classification of Human Body Odor Using an Electronic Nose. Sensors, 9, 7234-7249. (doi 10.3390/s90907234 - resolve via dx.doi.org)
How Internet Odors Will Work (howstuffworks.com)
Related imagery and concepts on the Edible Geography blog (ediblegeography.com)

Monday, 30 October 2017

Exercise: Battleship as a metaphor for Plans or Planning

Exploring the difference between design and designing, or  plan and planning.

Step 1:
Individuals produce one or more up-front plans using provided blank sheets.

Step 2:
Open the playable version of battleship on GitHub.
Enter each up-front plan using the 40 shots per iteration game.

Step 3:
Enter your results in the survey form (survey form here)
Look at and discuss the results (data spreadsheet here)

Step 4:
Allocate 'iteration ranges' to individuals or groups and ask them to attempt to obtain the best possible result.
Continue to capture the result of each game in the survey form (survey form here)
Look at and discuss the results (data spreadsheet here)

Discussion:
What might 'design' be with respect to this game?
What might 'strategy' be with respect to this game?
What might 'project planning' be with respect to this game?
What (if anything) might this exercise highlight for projects in general?

Notes and References:

The members of Zilverblog have developed a simple version of the Battleship game, written in Javascript, as a tool to illustrate a number of ideas that seem to be relevant to planning systems development. For example:
The difference between Plans and Planning
The value of feedback
Cost and reward
The size of an effort versus the payback in terms of information
The game-like nature of projects (like pinball, the goal is to play again?)

From the Zilverblog The Power of Feedback in Scrum:
Update: Now also direct playable on GitHub.
"Board layouts are random and you get 40 shots in total to destroy the enemy’s fleet. After each iteration you get feedback about hits and misses. If you use iterations of 1, you are playing the regular battleship-game. Each shot costs 10.000 and when you sink a ship you get the_ships_size * 50.000 (e.g. the submarine of size 3 will reward you with 150.000). If you keep track of the balance after each iteration, you could also try to get across the idea that stopping after a few iterations might give ‘good enough’ rewards. It can be downloaded from our GitHub repository as a zip or you can take a look at our code. Just double click on the index.html (in the public folder) to start a game."


Wednesday, 25 October 2017

Thursday networking evening - social and pizza - scholars and alumni

Thursday November 2 2017 - the MSc Digital Innovation cohort

All welcome to our Thursday evening gathering at the Smurfit Lounge.
social and pizza - scholars and alumni

Please register here https://goo.gl/pFf6fb

We are open for networking from 17:00. Pizza+options and refreshment provided by Urban Picnic.

For directions in Google Maps (link)

Monday, 23 October 2017

Colossal Cave Adventure

An archeology of interactive role playing games leads inevitably to a small handful of innovative and influential programs developed over the decade spanning the sixties and seventies. One of the most influtential of these games was a program call the Colossal Cave Adventure. Originally written by Will Crowther, then developed further by Don Woods with Will's consent.
Ports of Adventure to newer operating platforms and language environments have enabled users to play Adventure on successive generations of computing hardware and operating system environments. However the core of the game remains the same and concept, gameplay and feel. A player running the port to Mac OS/X or the console version for Windows XP is subject to essentially the same experience as those who encountered it on University computer servers in the 70s and 80s.
While the game is no longer actively developed the concept of Advent inspired a host of related programmes in the 1980s all vying for the hearts, minds, or money, of the world's growing band of computer enthusiasts and users.

Seeing Adventure running for the first time is like walking along the beach and picking up an interesting looking shell. Someone has left the terminal logged in... It intrigues with three sentences:

YOU ARE STANDING AT THE END OF A ROAD BEFORE A SMALL BRICK
BUILDING . AROUND YOU IS A FOREST. A SMALL
STREAM FLOWS OUT OF THE BUILDING AND DOWN A GULLY.
Ahh, a game. What do I do? The blinking cursor invites me to write something.

help!
 I DON'T KNOW THAT WORD.

help
 I KNOW OF PLACES, ACTIONS, AND THINGS. MOST OF MY VOCABULARY
 DESCRIBES PLACES AND IS USED TO MOVE YOU THERE. TO MOVE TRY
 WORDS LIKE FOREST, BUILDING, DOWNSTREAM, ENTER, EAST, WEST
 NORTH, SOUTH, UP, OR DOWN.  I KNOW ABOUT A FEW SPECIAL OBJECTS,
 LIKE A BLACK ROD HIDDEN IN THE CAVE. THESE OBJECTS CAN BE
 MANIPULATED USING ONE OF THE ACTION WORDS THAT I KNOW. USUALLY
 YOU WILL NEED TO GIVE BOTH THE OBJECT AND ACTION WORDS
 (IN EITHER ORDER), BUT SOMETIMES I CAN INFER THE OBJECT FROM
 THE VERB ALONE. THE OBJECTS HAVE SIDE EFFECTS - FOR
 INSTANCE, THE ROD SCARES THE BIRD.
 USUALLY PEOPLE HAVING TROUBLE MOVING JUST NEED TO TRY A FEW
 MORE WORDS. USUALLY PEOPLE TRYING TO MANIPULATE AN
 OBJECT ARE ATTEMPTING SOMETHING BEYOND THEIR (OR MY!)
 CAPABILITIES AND SHOULD TRY A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT TACK.
 TO SPEED THE GAME YOU CAN SOMETIMES MOVE LONG DISTANCES
 WITH A SINGLE WORD. FOR EXAMPLE, 'BUILDING' USUALLY GETS
 YOU TO THE BUILDING FROM ANYWHERE ABOVE GROUND EXCEPT WHEN
 LOST IN THE FOREST. ALSO, NOTE THAT CAVE PASSAGES TURN A
 LOT, AND THAT LEAVING A ROOM TO THE NORTH DOES NOT GUARANTEE
 ENTERING THE NEXT FROM THE SOUTH. GOOD LUCK!
Right, I'm starting to get this, lets see what the 'DOWNSTREAM' command does...

downstream
YOU ARE IN A VALLEY IN THE FOREST BESIDE A STREAM TUMBLING
ALONG A ROCKY BED.

downstream
AT YOUR FEET ALL THE WATER OF THE STREAM SPLASHES INTO A
2 INCH SLIT IN THE ROCK. DOWNSTREAM THE STREAMBED IS BARE ROCK.

lift rock
YOU ARE IN A 20 FOOT DEPRESSION FLOORED WITH BARE DIRT. SET INTO
THE DIRT IS A STRONG STEEL GRATE MOUNTED IN CONCRETE. A DRY
STREAMBED LEADS INTO THE DEPRESSION.

THE GRATE IS LOCKED

downstream
YOU CAN'T GO IN THROUGH A LOCKED STEEL GRATE!

This is getting interesting, quick, grab a piece of paper and start drawing a mental map of where I was and where I'm going...

And so it goes on. Time passes, I snap back to myself for a moment, twenty minutes later! What's happening here? It's engaging, appealing, frustrating and rewarding, like getting into a good book but this one talks back to you.

Term paper and presentation guidelines


1. RESEARCH PROJECT:


Please acknowledge and reference all third party material, copyright etc.
University College Dublin policies on plagiarism apply. 


On the subject of Writing - A couple of general points may be useful.
Consider phrasing your investigation as a question.
Working Title: Initially, phrase a research question as the title of the paper (you can change it later).
Abstract: Restate and expand on the research question in the abstract (you can change it later when you have analysed your findings).
Research Access: Make good use of your personal access to your contacts, projects or companies, past or present for providing data.

The challenge is to design a study that adequately accesses the kind of data that can be analysed in such a way that you can make substantial inferences from the data. There are different ways of going about the work. I would expect you to juxtapose your proposal against previous studies of a similar vein in the area.



2. Term paper options

Three alternatives: written in the style of a journal research article.
A. Usability, requirements analysis, and feasibility study to update a digital business product/service. 
or
B. Understanding, applying and evaluating the use of XYZ research method: lessons learned evaluating a digital business product/service.
or 
C. A company/project case study: lessons learned from a project to enhance/develop a  digital business product/service.
Research Methods: Use at least two different research methods to conduct the empirical study.



3.0 Deliverables: Term-paper plus video presentation
Term-paper: Approximately 5,000 words (not including cover page, figures, footnotes or appendix). Further guidelines below.
Video presentation: The video presentation can give a concise overview of the subject matter and impact of your term-paper in a short video format (4 minute duration).
You are expected to create your own original narration and/or spoken audio content, similarly you should utilise as much of your own visual/graphical material as possible. You can of course utilise various elements sourced elsewhere (subject to license) as background or linking pieces, e.g. diagrams, music etc. if needed as content or for artistic balance.
Grade deduction if the presentation/video has text-to-speech narration or uses 'canned animation.'
While not being graded separately from the term-paper, no presentation video results in losing half the available mark for the research project.



General pointers on writing...
Writing styles: The term paper is written in an academic style, presenting your background reading, method, research, analysis, theorising and critiquing aspects, for example of the the history, situation, processes etc of a particular sourcing context. Consider identifying an exemplary paper that you aspire to emulate or to compare your own paper with.
You must use the specified scientific conference template for the term-paper. Choose between either the LaTeX or Word template from the ECIS 2015 conference. Copies are available on (Google Drive link). By using the ECIS template your paper will conform with the scientific format guidelines for that conference.
Most important! Please ensure that any direct use of 3rd party material (particularly internal documentation) is presented within quotation marks or boxed or otherwise marked in some way and with the appropriate citation/identification. 

Term Paper Submission: Submit the term paper via SafeAssign in Blackboard.
Presentation Submission: Email a link to the video (e.g. from Vimeo or YouTube) or slides (e.g. from SlideShare).


Possible structure of a journal style paper - not all sections may be needed
Title
The title and abstract should both capture the essence of the study.
Abstract 
Introduction / Literature (positioning)
Give a brief introduction to the literature and positioning for the study.
Research Design / Methods / Context
Outline your research design, and method.
Data / Findings
Tell the story, provide the evidence, findings, account or narrative.
Analysis / Discussion
Analysis and discussion allow you to draw out the significance of what you have discovered. This is where you can apply/trial various analytical models or produce your own interpretation of the data, in order to better understand the evidence.
Conclusions
Conclusions summarise the findings concisely, often in a page. This is a overall synthesis distilling your analysis and its relevance to theory and the literature.
Bibliography/References
The bibliography/reference section is crucial to get right as it is the index to prior research and literature that you have referred to previously.
Appendices (if needed)
Use appendices to provide additional detail if necessary. Usually data samples, or intermediate representations, for example a sample of the data analysis process, coding frames, stages in the coding and summary or intermediate categories from data.



Grading
Grading will consider the following criteria:
  1. Research area and method defined and explained.
  2. Critical understanding of topic/area and assumptions stated.
  3. Empirical work, data and evidence presented.
  4. Structure of argument, interpretation and conclusions.
  5. Use of literature and overall quality of the written document.

A brief explanation of letter grade descriptors is provided below.

Modular (letter) grades.

A+/A
  • The report is suitable for submitting to conference, journal, or executive with little revision.
  • There is a compelling logic to the report that reveals clear insight and understanding of the issues.
  • Analytical techniques used are appropriate and correctly deployed.
  • The analysis is convincing, complete and enables creative insight.
  • The report is written in a clear, lucid, thoughtful and integrated manner-with complete grammatical accuracy and appropriate transitions.
  • The report is complete and covers all important topics.
  • Appropriate significance is attached to the information presented.
  • Research gathered is summarised in some way, research and analytical methods described and discussed, evidence linked to argument and conclusions.
A-/B+
  • The report may be suitable for submitting to conference, journal, or executive if sections are revised and improved.
  • There is a clear logic to the report that reveals insight.
  • Analytical techniques used are appropriate and correctly deployed.
  • The analysis is convincing, complete and enables clear insight.
  • The report is written in a clear, lucid, and thoughtful manner-with a high degree of grammatical accuracy.
  • The report is complete and covers all important topics.
  • Appropriate significance is attached to the information presented.
B/B-
  • The report may be suitable as a discussion draft for further development or refinement.
  • There is a clear logic to the report.
  • Analytical techniques are deployed appropriately.
  • The analysis is clear and the authors draw clear, but not comprehensive conclusions for their analyses.
  • The report is written in a clear, lucid and thoughtful manner, with a good degree of grammatical accuracy.
  • The report is substantially complete, but an important aspect of the topic is not addressed.
  • The report may have used or presented some information in a way that was inappropriate. 
C
  • The report may be suitable as a preliminary draft but needs substantial revision in a number of areas to develop further.
  • The basic structure of the report is well organised but may need rebalancing.
  • The content of the report may be partial, incomplete or unfinished with important aspects not addressed.
  • The report used information that was substantially irrelevant, inappropriate or inappropriately deployed.
  • The report’s analysis is incomplete and authors fail to draw relevant conclusions.
  • The report may contain many errors in expression, grammar, spelling.
D/E
  • The report may appear to be preliminary, speculative, and/or substantially incomplete.
  • Whatever information provided is used inappropriately.
  • The structure of the report may be inappropriate or need substantial reorganisation and/or rebalancing.
  • There may be little analysis, evidence may not be founded, the findings may be inconclusive.
  • The report appears to frequently use information that is substantially irrelevant, inappropriate or inappropriately deployed.
  • The report may be poorly written, organised and presented.
  • Frequent errors of grammatical expression.

Friday, 20 October 2017

Learner's links


Website
http://zung.me
https://ucd-amadeus.tumblr.com/
https://siddheshbaraskar.wordpress.com/

https://vimeo.com/234239081
https://vimeo.com/234202382
https://www.youtube.com/edit?video_referrer=watch&video_id=FTnxigQ-C30
https://vimeo.com/user71352148

https://vimeo.com/234239604
https://vimeo.com/234240851
https://vimeo.com/234377981
https://donnachadunleavy-mis41020.blogspot.ie/
https://vimeo.com/234284743
https://medium.com/@VanessaFieres
https://freshfreethoughts.blogspot.ie/2017/09/systems-systems-systems_18.html
https://vimeo.com/234297154
https://vimeo.com/234224733


https://yannickhoffmann.wordpress.com/
https://vimeo.com/234367868
https://vimeo.com/234238212
https://jyotikangule.wordpress.com/
https://vimeo.com/234215485
https://shilpakolagani.wixsite.com/shilpakdublin/smurfit-diaries-1
https://vimeo.com/234234455
http://www.francisdiginno.wordpress.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6wiaSeBTYc
www.adammasojada.com
https://vimeo.com/234327925
www.medium.com/@danmc_83308.com
https://designdevelopmentcreativity.wordpress.com
https://vimeo.com/234214415
https://neumannatucd.wordpress.com/
https://vimeo.com/234193231
https://www.farnaznoori.com/
https://emeroreillysite.wordpress.com/
https://kateoconnordigitalinnovation.wordpress.com/
https://shivaaniojha.wordpress.com
https://flaviagdo.wixsite.com/flaviagdo
https://nataniela9.wixsite.com/home
https://vimeo.com/235187726
https://blog.donalrafferty.com
https://vimeo.com/234344141
https://struggleofthejuggle.blogspot.ie/
http://sinteredwords.wordpress.com
https://nicolemis40120.blogspot.ie/
https://vimeo.com/234232197
https://vimeo.com/234643122
https://vimeo.com/234324034
https://vimeo.com/234224750
https://vimeo.com/234247410

Tuesday, 10 October 2017

MSc in Advanced Software Engineering - part-time applications

The UCD School of Computer Science invites applications for the part-time MSc in Advanced Software Engineering, starting in December 2017. This programme is tailored for the industry-based software engineer who wants to develop their skills further and gain a higher degree, without taking a break from full-time employment. Participants attend six, one-week-long modules over a two-year period, and undertake a masters project in the latter half of their second year.

The modules currently on offer are: Performance of Distributed Systems, High Performance Computing, Agent-Oriented Software, Comparative Software Engineering Process Frameworks, Knowledge-based Techniques in Software Engineering, Computational Network Analysis and Modelling, and Design Patterns.

The masters project itself is developed in negotiation with your advisor, and is usually based on your own proposal.

The UCD School of Computer Science is ranked as the joint top Computer Science department in Ireland, according to the 2016 QS World University Rankings.

For further information including student testimonials and how to apply, please see here:
http://csserver.ucd.ie/~meloc/MScASE/Introduction

If you have any questions, just email the programme director, Mel Ó Cinnéide, at mel.ocinneide@ucd.ie.

(on Linkedin: http://tinyurl.com/ASELinkedin)

Friday, 6 October 2017

Two industry seminars / careers presentations Wed 11th.

Open invite to seminar arranged by the MSc Business Analytics programme. 
On Wednesday 11th Oct in Lecture Theatre 1.
Version 1
Title: Accelerating the Value of Data Analytics
Time: 4.15-5pm
Location: Lecture Theatre 1
1) The move to Open Data Science and importance of IT & Data Governance
2) DevOps Fundamentals.
3) DevOps to DataOps
4) Tools for DataOps, How V1 uses them
5) Introduction to the Version 1 Accelerate Graduate Campaign.

Followed by.
PwC
Title: Opportunities within PwC
Time: 5.30-5.45pm
Location: Lecture Theatre 1

Thursday, 5 October 2017

Gathering and managing requirements

User requirements and analysis is often considered to be the starting point for the systems development process. There are many requirements management frameworks most of which are basically templates and checklists for gathering and recording a variety of user-oriented data.

Examples:
  • Atlassian's Confluence/Jira offers a sophisticated holistic model for capturing, storing, presenting requirements for future development. See this example from the Confluence/Jira tutorial (link).
  • A typical/conventional/traditional requirements document; source - a student engineering project (link)
hightechrequirements
A selection of typical requirements documents.
Some musings on requirements:
Product requirements can be thought of as a rather unique kind of shopping list; a shopping list written by (more often on behalf of) the user, and written for (usually by) the developer to deliver. Taking the analogy further; the requirements shopping list is for a shop where the shelves are initially empty because the things the user wants haven’t been made yet. Alternatively there may be something on the shelf that approximates what the user wants but it’s not quite right and needs to be customized. To compound this seemingly odd situation we may also find that product requirements may be written (created) by someone who is neither the customer (user) nor the designer (developer). In this situation those charged with requirements capture have a lot of responsibility and power to influence the design process. Product requirements lie between the user and the designer and act as a communication device between the two. The requirements document is merely a representation of a potentially unbounded set of product requirements therefore the process used to create the representation is perhaps more significant that the document itself.

Links of interest?
https://svpg.com/the-end-of-requirements/

Wednesday, 4 October 2017

Previous research topic titles

Previous research topic titles listed below:
  • Using the Trinity ID as a starting point, how can iDly update that system in order to enhance the features of their digital ID cards?
  • How to improve the Dash students’ experience?
  • Housemydog.com: how to enhance the design and development features of a dog minding platform through a usability and feasibility study
  • BRS Golf Booking System
  • Plynk - the money messenger
  • Can sleep apps improve your sleep troubles?
  • Improving Hailo
  • Aer Lingus iOS app usability study
  • Usability analysis on IPF app for Patient M Power
  • How can the “dublinbikes” mobile application better reflect and channel the innovative nature of bike sharing 
  • The Dublin Bus Mobile Application: usability analysis
  • GiapSchool usability study and improvement
  • UCD Mobile: Usability & Requirements Study and Development proposal
  • Roomys Evaluation and Improvement Project
  • Effy solutions usability study and design proposal
  • Metrifit usability, requirements analysis and feasibility study to update extant system.
  • External Brain: Experiencing Evernote
  • Design and development proposal for ChildDiary v2.0
  • Buymie v1.2.0 – Usability Study
  • “Pay and Display” Is displaying necessary?
  • Cocoon: Lessons Learned From Evaluating a Software Startup.
  • A proposal for an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system upgrade
  • (Kammavari Sangha Institute of Technology) KSIT website debunked
  • Redesign and Recreate a System for an Agency of Home Appliances Maintenance and Repair Services
  • Improving Trancehub
  • Selling, Point of Sale and Shop Systems for JD Sports
  • Smart Baggage Claim for RFID Enabled Airports
  • Coapp - collaboration tool for web designers
  • A Website Redesign of Ard Scoil Ris
  • Upgrading of Irish Light Rail ‘Luas Tram’ Ticketing and Fare Collection Machine
  • ‘Echo - The Premier Communication Application’
  • In-Car Voice Interaction System Redesign Proposal
  • Product for Bass Guitar to Midi Converter
  • Website Redesign Proposal for U.C.D Applied Language Centre
  • Redesigning Dublin’s Traffic Control System
  • Redesign of an Existing System Cineworld Ticket ATMs
  • Daft.ie Using Technology to Restructure Services
  • Tesco Mobile App: Connecting Recipes and Shopping function
  • UX/ID for Irish Multiplex Cinemas
  • To Improve the User Interface of the Blackboard Learn System
  • A Redesign Proposal for the Coillteoutdoors.ie Website
  • UPC Horizon UX Issues
  • CRM for an Online Insurance Broker - A Case Study
  • Stamp App - The Future of Postage Stamps
  • Redesign Proposal of PAYE Anytime
  • Android application for shopping and payment purposes with the use of NFC technology
  • HR System Functionality and Leave Management
  • Online Banking: A study of two Irish Bank’s and Possible Improvements
  • Leap Card New payment system proposal
  • Improving RTE Player
  • An Analysis and re-design of the current E-xamit website
  • Tool Repair System
  • UCARD System Development
  • Self-Service Library Machine: 3M ‘R-Series Model ‘8600’
  • Improving Tesco Self-Service Checkout
  • Bank of Beijing Personal Internet Banking System
  • SiSWeb – Redesign Proposal
  • Enhancing the Reporting Capabilities of a Banking Organisation
  • I-Concentrate - Control access to Apps, Networks, and Websites
  • A Redesign of the Current ATM System in Ireland
  • Improving user Experience on CopiPrint Machines
  • Introducing Mobile Payment to Irish Transportation
  • Bus Éireann Website and Tech Services
  • An Analysis and Redesign of Ticketmaster Event Ticketing Service Provider
  • Proposed Redesign of the Mantis Issue Tracking System
  • A Redesign of the Twitter Newsfeed
  • Analysis of current Intranet Facilities and Proposed Redesign
  • Re-design of the Ulysses self-service Help Desk module used by St. John of God Hospitaller Ministries
  • Redesign of Ryanair Website
  • Ad Server
  • LEAP Integrated Ticketing System
  • Ryanair.com- How can we do better?
  • Report on Sony Entertainment Network’s Online Store And Proposed Recommendations
  • Application Virtualization: An Aid for OS Migration (Windows)
  • Gamification of McDonalds App
  • Dublin.ie Redesign Proposal
  • Trolly Folly: An Analysis of the Ryanair Online Shopping Experience
  • The Introduction of a paid car parking solution to the UCD Campus locations of Belfield and Blackrock
  • Improving the M50 Eflow toll system
  • Payzone Parking Tag
  • Protecting ATM Users from Fraud


Guest seminar - Version 1 - The Consultant’s Guide to Business Benefit

A presentation by Version 1's Sanket Dubey (MSc DI alumnus) and Alan Reilly - Learning & Development Consultant
When/where:
Monday- 9th Oct @10 AM. Room D101, UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate School of Business, Blackrock, Dublin.
Google maps reference with room location and suggested parking zones.
https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/edit?mid=zI3tiisSQK_k.kqOUvhH4ARXE

The title of the talk is "The Consultant’s Guide to Business Benefit", a presentation and discussion about implementing CAP (Common Agricultural Policy) IT systems for the Irish Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine.

At go-live over €1 billion of EU Direct Payments were made to farmers in the first 3 months of system deployment, the highest volume of online payment of any EU member state.
Verison1 is the Irish Consulting, Solutions and Outsourced Managed Services Company http://www.version1.com/
See Version 1, case studies - https://www.version1.com/Insights/Case-Studies